Attractions - Things to See

Sights on the Kenai Peninsula.

Bountiful Wildlife

The Kenai Peninsula Borough is 90% wilderness and therefore a destination of choice for Alaskan travelers who desire to observe wildlife within its natural habitat. We serve as the gateway for Alaska's best one-day flightseeing trips to view the famed Katmai and Wolverine Creek bears. The Kenai is home to one black bear per square mile. Black or brown bears may be spotted from your vehicle, from your raft as you float by, or up on the mountainside while hiking our miles of improved trails.

The Kenai’s coast is one of Alaska's prime viewing areas for marine wildlife. Kenai Fjords is certainly a mecca for marine wildlife watchers, as is Kachemak Bay. Birding is world class, and many travelers time their visit to witness some of nature's special events: the migration of shorebirds in Homer or the gathering of snow geese on the Kenai River flats. Did we mention moose? Formerly known as the Kenai National Moose Range, the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge is a sanctuary that comprises approximately a third of the peninsula and provides an ideal haven for moose, lynx, wolves, dall sheep, caribou, fox, coyotes and more.


Kenai Peninsula Birding Festival

Where the river ends and the birding begins!

The Kenai Peninsula boasts pristine beaches, beautiful state parks, a fantastic wildlife refuge and, best of all, thousands of birds. This four-day festival is designed to showcase and celebrate peninsula birds for all ages and abilities. Suitable for the beginner as well as the advanced birder, the festival includes informative sessions, social gatherings and birding field excursions.

Learn more about the Kenai Peninsula Birding Festival

Rivers & Lakes

The surprising turquoise color of many of The Kenai’s rivers and lakes is very unusual and is caused by just the right blending of glacial waters and snowmelt. Home to spawning salmon, these rivers and lakes can be explored by rafting, fishing from drift or powerboats, or finding beautiful trails along the shores. Some of Alaska’s wildest whitewater, as well as some of its most placid and scenic waterways, can be found on The Kenai. The quaint settlements of Moose Pass and Cooper Landing, along with the larger communities of Sterling, Soldotna, and Kenai, owe a substantial portion of their livelihoods to the bounty of fish, scenery, and wildlife that the Kenai watershed provides.

Kachemak Bay/Homer Spit

There aren’t many cities in the world where virtually everybody has a view lot, but that’s just a way of life in Homer. Venture out on the Homer Spit, a narrow arm of land that extends out into the ocean, you’ll be surrounded by breathtaking views of mountains, glaciers and Kachemak Bay. For a reasonable fee, water taxis take you across the Bay to the hiking trails of the lush forests, mountains, and glaciers of Kachemak Bay State Park. If you enjoy wandering among tide pools, this area provides a unique glimpse into the lives of the creatures of the tidal zone. The Cook Inlet encounters the 2nd most extreme tidal activity in the world and reveals numerous and diverse shellfish for your harvesting and tasting.

Four Active Volcanoes

There aren’t many places in the world where you can gaze upon four active volcanoes from one stretch of beautiful highway. From north to south, Mt. Spurr, Mt. Redoubt, Mt. Illiamna and St. Augustine all may be viewed from the western shore of the Kenai Peninsula, out across Cook Inlet to the Alaska Peninsula. The volcano coast isn’t the only scenic drive on the Peninsula…one would have a hard time choosing a favorite stretch of road—there are dramatic vistas and spectacular scenery from one community to the next.

Kenai Mountains/Harding Ice Fields

Mountains connect The Kenai to the rest of Alaska, and mountains link the regions of The Kenai together. They form the setting, the backdrop, or the stunning scenery on the horizon. They span The Kenai’s four major protected areas: Chugach National Forest, Kenai Fjords National Park, Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, and Kachemak Bay State Park. These mountains hold a contiguous ice field that is larger than the state of Rhode Island, is a half-mile deep, and is reachable by an adventuresome trail or two. They are the most accessible mountains in the state; with more than 433 miles of improved trails to help you find your own private mountain paradise for your day hike, backpacking trip, or leisurely walk.

Kenai's Fjords National Park

Over the eons, glacier ice has carved valleys that are now submerged under seawater, thus forming the fjords. Kenai Fjords National Park preserves this magical part of the Peninsula, and a diverse fleet of small ships delivers the experience. The Kenai Fjords offers more than majestic scenery—few places in the world can boast of the stunning concentrations of wildlife viewed on a daily basis in the Kenai Fjords and the adjoining islands of the Maritime National Wildlife Refuge: sea otters, puffins, sea lions, kittiwakes, humpback and orca whales, harbor seals, oyster catchers and more. Glaciers are still making their way down from the ice fields, and witnessing the calving of huge chunks of ice from the glacier’s face as it meets the sea reminds us that the Kenai Fjords are still under construction.

Passport to Adventure on The Kenai

Passport to The Kenai PeninsulaThe Passport to The Kenai features pages for each community on which to collect stamps throughout the Kenai Peninsula Borough.

Collect enough stamps and you will be eligible to enter for a grand prize Kenai Peninsula vacation drawing. Get it NOW!

Free Discovery Guide

Request your FREE Kenai Peninsula Discovery Guide!
The Discovery Guide includes everything you will need to plan your next trip to The Kenai. Not only will you find hundreds of listings for lodging opportunities, river guides, open-water charters, and bear viewing tours, but you will also get a fold-out map of the entire Kenai Peninsula!